Archive for Baby Led Weaning

Weaning Top Tips from Dietitians

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WEANING TWITTER CHAT

Last night dietitians from all four corners of the world, came together on twitter to chat about weaning. There were more than 500 tweets in 1 hour and lots of tips and experiences were shared so I thought I would capture a few for your benefit.

  • A variety of tastes and textures is key to successful weaning and a lower risk of fussy eating later in life
  • Mum is an important role model. Its important for mum to not influence her little one with her likes and dislikes
  • Having family meals together may help your baby accept new flavours (a spoon for baby and a spoon for mum) and gets them ready for fmaily meals later
  • Never give up, after many attempts they may eventually accept that new flavour
  • Babyled weaning may encourage self feeding but may not be suitable for slow developers. Its ok to combine spoon feeding with self feeding.
  • Spoon feeding has its place if done properly. Let your baby come to the spoon and not the other way round.
  • Weaning is great time for the whole family to start some new eating habits
  • Don’t feel you have to cook new recipes when weaning. Amend family favourites to make sure they are low in salt and sugar
  • Cook in bulk and freeze for days when you are not cooking.
  • Keep commercial weaning foods for when you need the convenience, they are not for everyday.
  • If you are worried about the choking risk, do a first aid course so you know what to do if it ever happens.
  • Expect lots of mess but have fun!

Catch up on the full twitter chat here: Weaning

Weaning on twitter

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Social media really can be a great thing for sharing information. We had a really exciting twitter chat last month on weaning. Lots of dietitians, mums and bloggers came together and shared their tips on all things related to weaning.

To read what we discussed, click here: Weaning Twitter Chat

We run these #rduk nutrition chats monthly so join us live for a future one!

Baby Led Weaning vs. Purees

Oscar BLW

A lot of people have asked me recently about skipping purees and going straight into baby led weaning. There are pros and cons to every weaning approach. You need to find the approach that works for you but here are some of my thoughts if you are looking for guidance.

Baby Led Weaning

The theory is that if you wait until 6 months your baby can skip purees and start feeding themselves with finger foods. The baby takes part in family meal times and the baby decides how much she/he will eat. Your baby is in the driving seat but finger foods have their limitations.

Traditional Weaning 

This approach starts with spoon feeding of purees which progresses through four stages of textures. Using a spoon can be helpful when trying to achieve variety as some foods are not good finger foods. It’s very much a parent led agenda and the risk is the parent does not respect the child’s refusal and spoon feeding becomes intrusive.

Supportive Weaning

I believe there is a good middle ground and both spoon feeding and finger foods have their place in the weaning process. Just as long as you, the parent, fulfil your feeding role then there is no risk that spoon feeding becomes a negative experience.

  • Attentive feeding is at the heart of this approach. Respect your role in the feeding realtionship (see earlier post) and watch for signs that your baby wants more or has had enough.
  • There is nothing wrong with spoon feeding if it is done properly. When you first start with weaning your child will most likely be unable to feed themselves sufficiently. Spoon feeding will provide taste exposure and nutrition until they can adequately eat by themselves. I have known some babies to start waking up at night again because baby led weaning did not fill them up.
  • Let them play with food even whilst you are spoon feeding e.g. give them a soft cooked carrot stick to chew on. That way they get to feel the texture and engage with the food.
  • Be wary of iron deficiency.The foods that are good sources of iron (chicken, meat, fish, beans/lentils) are often hard to give a 6 month old as finger foods so spoon feeding is handy for these.
  • The stages of weaning are not time specific. Your child may progress very quickly through purees and textured foods to soft finger foods. Let your child be your guide to the right texture for them at that stage.
  • Encourage family meals. Try to involve your baby in your meal times (have them sit at the table with you) and try to eat something when they eat. And instead of cooking separate meals, try to tailor your meals to your little one (no sugar and salt).

TOP TIP: Let your child’s development determine how you progress with weaning and what type of foods you offer.